Geschützwagen IVb für 10.5 cm leFH 18/1

German Reich (1939) Self-Propelled Artillery – 12 Built (2 Prototypes+ 10 Pre-Production Vehicles) Click here to partake! The development of the Panzer division concept in Germany during the 1930s played a significant role in creating an effective offensive force. The mass concentration of tanks within these divisions provided considerable firepower, allowing them to overcome most …

10.5 cm K gepanzerte Selbstfahrlafette “Dicker Max”

German Reich (1941-1942) Heavy Tank Destroyer/Bunker Buster – 2 Built The “10.5 cm K (gp.Sfl.)” (Eng. 10.5 cm cannon (armored self-propelled gun)) or “10 cm K. Pz.Sfl.IVa” (Eng. 10 cm cannon self-propelled gun IVa), more commonly known as the “Dicker Max” (Eng. Fat Max), was a German self-propelled artillery gun. Development started in 1939, with …

15 cm sIG 33 auf Panzerkampfwagen I ohne Aufbau Ausf.B Sd.Kfz.101

German Reich (1940) Self-Propelled Artillery – 38 Built + At Least 5 Modified The concept of mounting a heavy infantry gun on a tank chassis was born out of the need for providing the German infantry formations with more mobile artillery support. In order to test the whole concept, the German firm Alkett designed and …

Gepanzerter 8t Zugkraftwagen and 8.8 cm BuFlak ‘Bunkerknacker’

German Reich (1938-1940) Armored Towing Vehicle – 25+ Built Anti-Aircraft Gun – 33 to 50 Modified Prior to the Second World War, the Germans were aware that they would need weapons that could deal with enemy fortified positions, such as bunkers. Their anti-tank guns and most of the artillery were not suited for this task. …

10.5 cm leFH 18/2 (Sf.) auf Fahrgestell Panzerkampfwagen II ‘Wespe’ (Sd.Kfz.124)

German Reich (1943) SPG – 662-753 Built The greatest strength of the German Panzer Divisions during World War II was their rapid speed and ability to engage the enemy with concentrated force. But, sometimes, this was not enough, and additional firepower was needed to soften designated targets. This was the job of the Panzer Division’s …

Hummel-Wespe 10.5 cm SPG

German Reich (1944) SPG – 12+ Built The 10.5cm Hummel-Wespe Artillery SPG There is only one known photograph of a Hummel self-propelled gun (SPG) chassis and body fitted with an artillery 10.5cm le.F.H. 18/40 L/28 howitzer rather than the normal 15cm s.FH 18/1 L/30 howitzer. It was officially called the Hummel-Wespe. This name was used …

10.5 cm leFH 18/3 (Sf.) auf Geschützwagen B2(f)

German Reich (1942) SPG – 16 Built The Giant SPG With the fall of France in May 1940, the German Army captured a lot of French Army tanks and vehicles. They called them Beutepanzer (trophy tanks). The approximate numbers of French AFVs captured by the German Wehrmacht are as follows: 300x Panhard-178; 3,000 Renault-UE; 350 …

10.5 cm leFH 16 auf Geschützwagen Mk.VI(e)

German Reich (1942) SPG – 6 Built The little SPG With the fall of France in May 1940, after the German Blitzkrieg invasion, all British Army Expeditionary Force (BEF) tanks and vehicles had to be left behind as the soldiers escaped back to England via the beaches of Dunkirk. When the vehicles were abandoned the …

10.5 cm leFH 16 (Sf.) auf Geschützwagen FCM 36(f)

German Reich (1942) SPG – 12 Built The German self-propelled howitzers There were two main types of self-propelled guns in the German Army during WW2. One was fitted with an anti-tank gun and the other with an artillery howitzer, like the 10.5cm leFH 18 (Sf.) auf Geschützwagen FCM 36(f) self-propelled gun. The vehicle fitted with …

15 cm sIG 33 (Sf.) auf Fahrgestell Panzerkampfwagen II

German Reich (1940-1941) SPG – 12 Built One of Rommel’s Funnies To move a towed 15 cm artillery piece, the Germans needed a team of six horses and three men to control and look after the horses. The five or six man additional crew rode on a wheeled limber behind the horses. Attached to the …