10.5 cm K gepanzerte Selbstfahrlafette “Dicker Max”

German Reich (1941-1942) Heavy Tank Destroyer/Bunker Buster – 2 Built The “10.5 cm K (gp.Sfl.)” (Eng. 10.5 cm cannon (armored self-propelled gun)) or “10 cm K. Pz.Sfl.IVa” (Eng. 10 cm cannon self-propelled gun IVa), more commonly known as the “Dicker Max” (Eng. Fat Max), was a German self-propelled artillery gun. Development started in 1939, with…

Panzer IV/70(V)

German Reich (1944) Tank Destroyer – 930 to 940 Built The further development of the StuG series led to the introduction of the Jagdpanzer IV tank destroyer. The Jagdpanzer IV was initially meant to be armed with the long 7.5 cm L/70 gun. As this gun was not available in sufficient numbers, as a temporary…

Semovente M43 da 75/46 / Beute Sturmgeschütz M43 mit 7.5 cm KwK L/46 852(i)

Italian Social Republic/German Reich (1943-1945) Tank Destroyer – 11 to 18 Built The Semovente M43 da 75/46 (English: 75 mm L/46 M43 Self-Propelled Gun) was the last self-propelled gun (SPG) produced by Italy during the Second World War. It was based on the previous Semovente M43 (plural semoventi) chassis, but featured new spaced armor that…

Jagdpanzer IV (Sd.Kfz.162)

German Reich (1943) Tank Destroyer – 750-800 Built As the Second World War progressed, the German Army faced an ever-increasing amount of enemy armor, while its own tank forces were steadily being reduced. Due to losses and meager production capabilities, the Germans were forced to introduce a series of improvised anti-tank vehicles. While these were…

7.62 cm F.K. 36(r) auf gepanzerte Selbstfahrlafette Sd.Kfz.6/3

German Reich (1941) Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Gun – 9 Built During the war, the Germans encountered ever increasing numbers of strong enemy armor. Due to a general lack of numbers of their own tanks, they were often forced to field improvised anti-tank vehicles. These were mostly based on obsolete tank chassis, such as the Marder series,…

4.7 cm PaK(t) (Sfl.) auf Fahrgestell Panzerkampfwagen 35R 731(f)

German Reich (1941) Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Gun – 174 Anti-Tank and 26 Command Vehicles Built After the defeat of France in June 1940, the Germans captured huge stockpiles of British and French war materiel. Some of the greatest prizes were the large quantities of tanks of several different types, including the Renault R35. While the R35…

Panzerjäger Tiger (P) 8.8 cm PaK 43/2 L/71 ‘Ferdinand/Elefant’ (Sd.Kfz.184)

German Reich (1943) Assault Gun/Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Gun – 89 Built + 2 Prototypes Following the cancelation of the Prof. Dr. Ferdinand Porsche’s VK45.01(P) heavy tank project, the Germans were left with 100 built chassis, including several completed tanks. As these represented a huge material, financial, and time investment, a solution for reusing these in some…

Jagdpanzer 38 (Hetzer)

German Reich (1944-1945) Tank Destroyer – Approximately 2,827 Built Introduction The first issue to clear up is the fact that the Jagdpanzer 38 was not officially called the Hetzer during the Second World War. Although most official wartime documents do not use the name Hetzer, a few did. Why this nickname has been associated with…

Jagdtiger (Sd.Kfz.186)

German Reich (1943-1945) Tank Destroyer – 74 Built The Jagdtiger was the heaviest armored vehicle to see service in World War Two, yet paradoxically, the vehicle has remained somewhat enigmatic with confusion over its development, production and role. The design process started out with a demand for a heavy assault gun back in 1942 when…

Panzer IV/70(A)

German Reich (1944) Tank Destroyer – 278 Built The Panzer IV/70(A) was born from earlier German attempts to place the 7.5 cm L/70 into a Panzer IV turret. As this was not possible, another solution was proposed by the firm of Alkett. Their design simply reused a modified Vomag Panzer IV/70(V) superstructure (armed with the…

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