7.5 cm StuK 42 L/70 auf StuG III

German Reich (1942) Assault Gun – Wooden Mock-Up Built The introduction of the long-barrel StuG III (Sturmgeschütz III, Eng. Assault gun vehicles) gave the Germans an excellent anti-tank vehicle that was cheap, combat effective, and was slowly being produced in ever-growing numbers. But its overall design was not perfect and there was room for improvement. …

Panzerjäger IV mit 8.8 cm PaK 43 L/71

German Reich (1944-1945) Tank Destroyer – Partial Blueprints and Sketches Only Most German vehicles from the latter period of World War II were developed to have either thick armor combined with powerful guns, such as the Maus or Jagdtiger, or standardized for easier and cheaper production, such as the Panzer 38(d), Panzer III/IV, and Entwicklung …

Entwicklungsfahrzeug 25 (E 25)

German Reich (1942) Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Gun – Possibly Up To 5 Prototypes Built During the Second World War, the Germans made extensive efforts to introduce a standardization of parts in tank and armored vehicle production. This was, to a limited extent, achieved with the Panther and Tiger II, which shared a number of parts. But, …

Jagdpanzer 38 D

German Reich (1944) Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Gun – 2 Prototypes Built The small and cheap Jagdpanzer 38(t) proved to be an effective tank destroyer. The main problem with it was that BMM and Škoda who made the vehicles simply could not keep up with the demand. In the hope of getting its production repositioned to Germany …

Panzer IV/70(E)

German Reich (1944) Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Gun – 1 Incomplete Prototype During the Second World War, the German Army officials wanted to improve the overall performance of their Panzer IIIs and IVs. One such project involved combining a number of elements from both tanks into a new design. In addition, new elements, such as an improved …

7.5 cm StuK auf Panzer 38(t)

German Reich (1942) Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Gun – 1 Prototype Built Following the setbacks during the 1941 campaign in the Soviet Union, the Germans were in great need of finding a proper answer to the T-34 and the KV tanks. They decided to go with two different solutions. One was to simply upgun vehicles already in …

Panzerselbstfahrlafette Ia 5 cm PaK 38 auf Gepanzerter Munitionsschlepper

German Reich (1941) Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Gun – 2 Prototypes Built During the Second World War, the German Army (Ger. Heer) saw a need to equip its Motorized Infantry and Airborne units with a cheap, light and mobile anti-tank vehicle. For this reason, Rheinmetall-Borsig was tasked with designing such a vehicle. While two would be built, …

15/17 cm Sturmgeschütz auf Mausfahrzeug

German Reich (1944) Assault Gun – None Built The Maus is possibly one of the most recognizable tanks ever made, despite only two hulls ever being finished. The entire history of the development, design, testing, and construction of the heaviest tank ever built is a long and convoluted one stretching from early concepts in 1941 …

30.5 cm L/16 auf Sfl. Bär

German Reich (1943) Assault Mortar – None Built After the Battle of Stalingrad ended in February 1943, a great effort was made by Germany to develop heavily armored vehicles armed to be more effective at assaulting fortified positions and buildings, particularly in urban environments. The realization that such a vehicle was required came soon after …

15/17 cm Sturmgeschütz auf E 100 Fahrgestell

German Reich (1944) Assault Gun – None Built The E 100, a 100-tonne experimental chassis developed by the firm of Adler using the Krupp 130-tonne Tiger-Maus design, was never finished. Partially complete at the end of the war, it was recovered to the UK for testing and evaluation and the ‘tank’ part of its history …

Tigerjäger Design B

German Reich (1943) Assault Gun – Design Only The Jagdtiger (Hunting Tiger) is a highly recognizable vehicle consisting of a huge flat-sided casemate built on the hull of the Tiger II Heavy Tank. What is less well known is that the Jagdtiger as we know it (design started in early 1943), was not the vehicle …

Panzerselbstfahrlafette Ic

German Reich (1940-1942) Tank Destroyer – 2 Built Ever since the late 1920s, the German Army (Heer) had recognised the need for self-propelled anti-tank guns. It was thought that by exploiting their mobility and low silhouette, these dedicated tank destroyers would be able to flank attacking enemy armor and take the momentum out of the …